Tag Archives: life lessons

Mother’s Day Re-Post: Lessons I Learned from my Grandma.

Thought I would re-post this in honor of my Mom and grandmothers.

I begin thinking about some things I learned from my grandma.

  1. Put God first.
  2. Family is important.
  3. That I was loved. There is no doubt that Grandma loved me. She also shared God’s love with me.
  4. Respect and take care of your elders.
  5. I was expected to behave and respect my elders. Being at Grandma’s was no excuse for poor behavior.
  6. Work hard, no one owes you anything.
  7. Get an education. An education opens doors and provides opportunities. If you don’t get a formal education then get one from books.
  8. How to cook
  9. Grandma shared her love for reading, jig-saw puzzles, and cross-words puzzles.
  10. Don’t waste anything. Grandma grew up in the depression and had learned to be frugal.

 

Repost: Top 10 — Stuff I learned from my Dad (and Granddads too)

Originally posted 19 June 2011.

In honor of Father’s Day I am sharing some of the important life lessons I learned from my Dad and my granddad’s.  I was blessed to have a Dad, Granddad, Great-Granddad and several uncles who were positive influences in my life.

#10: It is okay to be a nerd.

#9: To be careful where you park your ride. This was a painful but practical lesson my dad taught me. When I was in 5th or 6th grade I left my bike setting in the middle of the driveway. I had been warned not to do this. After many warnings my dad “impounded” my bike. He chained it to a rail in the garage and charged a small fine. I think the fine was around 25 cents. However, because I couldn’t pay the fine that day I also had to pay interest. By the time I had the money the total was a couple of dollars.

#8: Encouraged my creativity.

#7:  You are never too old to try something new.  This was something my great-granddad modeled.

#6: Actions have consequences, both positive and negative.

#5: Pay attention to the small things. My dad had a  shoe repair shop.  He insisted that all shoes be cleaned/shined. He even insisted on refinishing the soles of every shoe in for repairs. At the time it seemed ridiculous because refinishing the bottoms of the shoe. That had nothing to do with the quality of the repair work.  He said that people judged the quality of the repair job in part based on the way the shoes looked. If they looked as good as new, then customers would be impressed by it. I learned that paying attention to the details is helpful.

#4: The importance of hard work and doing a job right. My dad may have been one of the toughest boss I have ever had.

#3: Family is important. 

#2: To keep trying in spite of obstacles that at times appear insurmountable. My dad always tried to encourage me to keep going when things were tough.

#1: They shared God’s love in both actions and words.

Lessons from the Road

roadThere was road construction this summer on my path to work.  It is a two lane state road. They were repaving the road. They would close down one side of the road and use the other side for traffic in both directions. A worker was stationed at both ends of the construction area to direct traffic. A pilot car was used to guide traffic.  Warning signs where placed along the road instructing drivers to wait for the pilot cars. While waiting for the pilot car I discovered the following:

God has provided a guide for me. God’s word is available to guide my path. I just have to be willing and open to leading. It doesn’t matter how many Bibles I have around the house unless I make time to dig into the word.

Read the signs. It is up to me to read the instructions for life and chose to follow them. Unfortunately, my brain doesn’t have a USB slot  to insert a jump drive loaded with the Word. I have to choose to take time to open God’s Word and study it.  It is easy to get caught up in life and not take time to read the “signs”.

  105 Your word is a lamp for my feet,    a light on my path. (Psalm 119:105, New International Version)

Top 10: Stuff I learned from my Dad (and Granddads too)

In honor of Father’s Day I am sharing some of the important life lessons I learned from my Dad and my granddad’s.  I was blessed to have a Dad, Granddad, Great-Granddad and several uncles who were positive influences in my life.

#10: It is okay to be a nerd.

#9: To be careful where you park your ride. This was a painful but practical lesson my dad taught me. When I was in 5th or 6th grade I left my bike sitting in the middle of the driveway. I had been warned not to do this. After many warnings my dad “impounded” my bike. He chained it to a rail in the garage and charged a small fine. I think the fine was around 25 cents. However, because I couldn’t pay the fine that day I also had to pay interest. By the time I had the money the total was a couple of dollars.

#8: Encouraged my creativity.

#7:  You are never too old to try something new.  This was something my great-granddad modeled.

#6: Actions have consequences, both positive and negative.

#5: Pay attention to the small things. My dad had a  shoe repair shop.  He insisted that all shoes be cleaned/shined. He even insisted on refinishing the soles of every shoe in for repairs. At the time it seemed ridiculous to because refinishing the bottom of the show had nothing to do with the quality of the repair work.  He said that people judged the quality of the repair job in part based on the way the shoes looked. If they looked as good as new, then customers would be impressed by it. I learned that paying attention to the details is helpful.

#4: The importance of hard work and doing a job right. My dad may have been one of the toughest (non-crazy) bosses I have ever had.

#3: Family is important. 

#2: To keep trying in spite of obstacles that at times appear insurmountable. My dad always tried to encourage me to keep going when things were tough.

#1: They shared God’s love in both actions and words.

End of Year Reflection

This is my last post for 2010. Gee, seems like the year has just started. I guess this is the point where I’m supposed to write some sort of illuminating treatise full of great wisdom. It  I’m all out of witty sayings and wisdom right now. I do have a few observations for the year.

I’ve never been one for New Year’s Resolutions for many reasons. Goal setting is more my style. I guess they might be the same thing. For 2010, I decided to borrow an idea from a friend of selecting a theme for the year.  My theme was to Make a Difference.  I have tried to write more about causes  and other ways to make a difference. Spent some time this week redoing the Make a Difference Section.

Life doesn’t always go the way we plan. Sometimes even the unexpected bumps in life can turn out to unexpected blessings. I just have to be willing to trust God and look for the blessings.

One of those unexpected things this year is an unplanned move to problems with our condo.   I absolutely hate moving.  The process of moving can be a difficult and at times an insurmountable task. During the moving process I will eventually reach a point where I just want to toss everything or just leave. It was during the packing and unpacking stage that I realized there were some important lessons that can be learned from moving.  First, God is in the business of fresh starts and is willing to forgive us when we make a mess of things. This doesn’t mean there are no consequences from past actions. Second, sometimes you just have to get rid of the junk in our lives. Finally, a change of location can also change ones outlook and perspective.

It is so easy to forget that I was created by God, in his image and to have fellowship with him. Somehow I get my priorities messed up  and focus on my needs, wants and goals.

Real faith isn’t just for Sundays. What good is faith that does not affect ones daily life? Situations that challenge ones faith can also cause it to grow.  It is important to move from just reading about matters of faith and actually practice what one  believes.

People are more important than having nice things. Do not sacrifice friendships or other relationship to gain more things. Seize the little moments to make memories; you never know how many more you will get.

Those are just a few of my observations from 2010.